Monster in My Head, #Chant Poetry

Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

There’s a little monster in my head,

He’s a one-man percussion band,

beating his bongos and grinning —

maliciously.

There’s a little monster in my head,

who doesn’t like to go to bed.

When it’s time to sleep,

the little monster in my head

plays bongos and castanets and

vuvuzelas, jumping up and down inside my

cranium — that little monster in my head.

There’s a little monster in my head,

with a trampoline and a mallet

and — perhaps — a chisel,

and he’s doing unwelcomed and

random refurbishments —

that little monster in my head.

There’s a little monster in my head,

and he likes to play with the lights,

strobe lights and

disco lights

to go with the beat of the bongos,

to go with the beat of his mallet —

that little monster in my head.

There’s a little monster in my head,

doing the conga with his monster friends,

doing gymnastics with dangerous

objects — far worse than running

with scissors — that little monster in my head.

There’s a little monster in my head,

and I have no love for him.

I’d really like to evict him

and make him vacate —

that little monster in my head.

There’s a little monster in my head,

but I can not make him go —

that nasty wasty monster in my head.

There’s a little monster in my head,

and you might know his name.

Do you want to know it?

That little monster in my head?

His name is …

Migraine.

ยฉ Susan Joy Clark 2021

This was written — a little late again — for dVerse’s chant poetry challenge. I started out with a completely different poetry idea, but the migraine continues (a little bit reduced by medicine maybe) and has been quite distracting. So, I decided to write about it. There was once a commercial for some sort of migraine medication that presented the “migraine” like a cartoonized monster. In an abstract way, it kind of made sense to me (not scientifically,) but in the sense of how it feels. It’s too bad I didn’t make this coincide with Migraine Awareness Month which was in June.

19 thoughts on “Monster in My Head, #Chant Poetry

    1. Thank you, Dwight. It’s interesting. Sometimes, I get a bit of tinnitus type thing with the migraine. Anyway, I guess you can relate to having a noisy and annoying monster. ๐Ÿ˜›

  1. Having suffered with horrific migraines I knew exactly where you were going! Vivid descriptions of what happens in our heads. Thankfully in my mid 50โ€™s I cycled out of them.

    1. Well, that is encouraging maybe. I am not in my mid 50s yet. I will be turning 50 in January. It would be nice to have it go permanently … I’m glad (in a certain way) that you found it relatable but glad you don’t get them anymore.

    1. Thanks so much for your understanding, Bjorn. That is how it is. I wish more doctors had understanding. ๐Ÿ™‚

  2. Migraines have been known to be a real nuisance, more of a tragedy in our life. It has a lot to do with diets we’ve been told but it is of no help. Many suffer but not in silence. They often cry out loud. Pity!

    Hank

  3. Ouch! I’ve only experienced this monster a handful of times in my life, but I did guess his name. Your words could also describe all of those self-defeating thoughts which haunt us during sleepless nights. Thank you for reminding me about ‘vuvuzelas,’ I haven’t heard one of those since the World Cup back in ?2010

  4. This is beautifully done- I resonate with; “doing the conga with his monster friends,
    doing gymnastics with dangerous objects โ€” far worse than running with scissors โ€” that little monster in my head.”๐Ÿ’๐Ÿ’

  5. I think it’s really bad to have migraines. Sometimes one of my friends can’t even go to work. She then lies in bed with an ice pack on her head. Sometimes relaxation, biofeedback and massages help. For migraines and headaches, all possible therapies apart from tablets have been recommended to her. Some work well, others less so.
    Susan, I wish you all the best! ๐Ÿฅฐ
    Rosie from Germany

    1. Thank you, Rosie. I do find ice helps a lot when medicine doesn’t. I have a neck wrap that I freeze and use sometimes. Soothing music helps me too.

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