Summer Swim, #Poem,#Rimas Dissolutas

Cool blue water engulfing me,

Makes me feel weightless and light,

Floating, flowing, reflective blue,

Summertime pool, a source of joy.

Now have your choice of lake or sea,

Rippling, trickling, sparkling bright,

Fluid movement created new,

Entertaining now as a toy.

Shifting, wobbling and sliding free,

Spectrum of blue hues to the sight,

Circling you and caressing you,

Nature’s playland for a lithe koi.

Like that fish, it is my realm too,

Bobbling and floating as a buoy.

© Susan Joy Clark 2021

This was written for Go Dog Go Cafe’s challenge to write a rimas dissolutas form poem. Below is a quote from Go Dog Go Cafe’s page which was taken from Brewer’s poetry dictionary.

“Popular with 12th and 13th-century French poets, rimas dissolutas is a poem that rhymes and doesn’t rhyme. For instance, each stanza contains no end rhymes, but each line in each stanza rhymes with the corresponding line in the next stanza–sometimes employing an envoi at the end. There are no rules for meter, line length, or syllables–except that it should be consistent from stanza to stanza.”

Overflowing, #Tanka Tuesday, #Arkquain Swirl

My only photo of family dining on the Fourth didn’t turn out so well in the original,
so I tried out a few artsy filters.

we

gather

as a group,

our family.

we are eleven.

though we are missing a few,

we celebrate as we do,

with food, love and fun.

table is full

to the brim,

homemade

love,

filling

our tummies,

filling our hearts.

eleven members

of our now extended clan,

with two dogs joining the span,

adding to the love.

we talk and play,

as one team,

puzzling

and

planning,

uniting

all our talents.

our cup runs over,

and, likewise, our dinner plate

shares with the cup, the same fate,

from work of different hands.

our love and faith

together

will bind

us.

© Susan Joy Clark 2021

Some of the family, playing a game.

This was written for Colleen M. Chesebro’s Tanka Tuesday challenge. This week it’s poet’s choice, but Colleen pointed out a list of syllabic poetry forms at Poets’ Collective.

I went to the link at Poets’ Collective and tried an arkquain swirl, a different syllabic poetry form than I have tried before. An arkquain swirl has this syllable count pattern — 1234~5775~4321234~5775~4321234~5775~4321. It also has end rhymes on the seven syllable lines.

I was inspired by my recent July 4th celebration with family, which included a few family members I haven’t seen in quite a while. Our celebration was characterized by lots and lots of food, and playing a game which, just as the poem suggests, had us helping one another rather than opposing one another.

Rest Now, Little Doggies, And Sleep, #Poem, #Quatern

Remy left and Theo right

Rest now, little doggies, and sleep,

Find a nook that is safe and warm,

Perhaps in the crook of my arm,

Your furry head on my shoulder.

Silly doggies like to burrow,

Rest now, little doggies, and sleep,

Underneath the warm bed covers,

In the hollow between my shins.

Who will claim the favorite spot,

Snuggled next to your dear Susie?

Rest now, little doggies, and sleep,

You both should find a cozy nook.

Theo lies down along my legs,

Remy rests her bum against me,

Then moves to lean against my foot,

Rest now, little doggies, and sleep.

© Susan Joy Clark 2021

Theo left and Remy right

This was written for Go Dog Go’s challenge to write a quatern poem.

This poem has 16 lines broken up into 4 quatrains (or 4-line stanzas).
Each line is comprised of eight syllables.
The first line is the refrain. In the second stanza, the refrain appears in the second line; in the third stanza, the third line; in the fourth stanza, the fourth (and final) line.
There are no rules for rhyming or iambics.

I wrote another poem recently about sleeping dogs, The Dreamers, but that one is more fantasy. This one is more reality-based, inspired by Theo and Remy, two French bulldogs I take care of from time to time. They are accustomed to sleeping with people, with their owners and then with me, when I am with them. Their sleeping positions amuse me. I am surprised Theo and I both slept with his head on my shoulder.

Midsummer Tanka Trifecta, #Haikai Challenge

Photo by Marc Zimmer on Unsplash

the rain spritzes down,

leaving drops on lily leaves,

showering the plants,

providing wet nourishment,

shifting from spritz to downpour.

the strawberry moon

hovers majestically,

a giant pink orb

gleaming roseate brightness

in a purple-gray sky.

in her bright glory,

she looms peculiarly large

as seen just above

the ancient Acropolis,

seeming out of proportion.

sPhoto by Jesse Schoff on Unsplash

sun glares light and heat

as moisture drips down my back,

car is now sauna,

dogs lie outside unmoving,

sidewalk is now frying pan.

© Susan Joy Clark 2021

This is a response to Frank J. Tassone’s haikai challenge, where we were challenged to write a haikai poem of our choice on one of three possible themes or a combination: midsummer rain, strawberry supermoon or smoldering heat. Perhaps, I did too much, but I wrote three tanka poems and one of them is a double tanka.

Outside My Window, #Double Ennead

Rose from my garden

This month, for Carrot Ranch Literary Community, Colleen M. Chesebro challenges us to write a double ennead poem on a topic of our choice in 99 syllables, then reduce to a 48 syllable form, then 24 syllables and finally to a 12 syllable haiku. Here is my entry.

Double ennead form, 99 syllables

clouds like spun sugar in

periwinkle sky,

a tree’s outline in shadow in sunny grass,

white butterflies flying

above rose bushes.

golden yellow lilies

peeking out among

all of the green foliage in the garden,

red Japanese maple

branches wave gently.

a little brown sparrow

hops about in grass,

then flutters over to perch on the fence,

these are the sights I see

outside my window.

48 syllables, 4-7-5 stanza trio

spun sugar clouds

in a periwinkle sky,

butterflies flying.

yellow gold lilies

among the green foliage,

red maple branches,

small brown sparrow

flutters to perch on the fence,

outside my window.

24 syllables, (6-6-6-6,) 1 stanza

spun sugar clouds

in periwinkle sky,

butterflies and lilies,

sights outside my window

12 syllable haiku, short-long-short

spun sugar clouds

above white butterflies

and gold lilies.

© Susan Joy Clark 2021